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Sustainable Development

Musk's Magnificent Master Plan, Part Deux

Last month, Tesla dropped the ‘Motors’ from its name, sending out a tsunamic wave of speculation across the online tech and news sphere. Shortly after, low and behold, Musk reveals his Master Plan, Part Deux (a cheeky reference to Hot Shots! Part Deux), the first of several ‘big reveals’ Tesla and Musk have made in the past month.

Solar Power’s Progress: From Greek Stories to Powering Entire Countries

 

Solar power has always fascinated mankind. The sun is an eternal power source and nothing on this earth comes to close to the majesty of the sun. Even our fables were centered on how harnessing the power of the sun could give man a power unmatched by none. The earliest reference to solar power is from the 3rd century, when supposedly Archimedes fought off Roman ships by using a contraption (similar to a magnifying glass) to set them on fire. This story maybe only a story but it is the earliest record of man flirting with the power of solar.

A Field Guide to Community Solar in BC

It’s easy to understand why BC communities love solar energy: it’s a local solution to our energy needs, keeps valuable energy dollars in the community, and creates much need employment when traditional areas of the economy are struggling.

BCSEA Vancouver Chapter Pub Night - Another great night!

The BCSEA Vancouver Chapter held it's Monthly Pub Night event on July 12th. This, the fifth edition, was another great success, drawing members and non-members alike to converse, network and have fun in the process.

100% Renewable Energy by 2050 – coming to your town soon

As if the 2015 federal candidates debates weren’t exciting enough, for 2016 the Victoria Chapter has taken on the municipalities of southern Vancouver Island.

Inspired by the Renewable City Strategy of the City of Vancouver, we are asking the municipalities in our area to adopt a 2050 goal of meeting 100% of their energy use with renewables. And we mean all energy use in the community, not just municipal operations.

Fortis’ net metering program: transition to sustainable energy – or just too expensive?

Some net metering customers in south-central BC suffered a rude shock this April, when Fortis applied to the Utilities Commission to slash the rates it pays its net metering customers for annual net electricity they supply to the grid.

Fortis wants to change the rules to reflect what it calls the original purpose of the net metering program: i.e., to enable customers to offset their own consumption with their own renewable generation, rather than to provide a revenue generating opportunity for program participants.

Planning made pleasant with pizza!

The BCSEA Kamloops Chapter held two consultation meetings concerning an update to Kamloops' Official Community Plan, called KAMPLAN.  An official community plan is all about land use, with implications for transportation, housing, parks, and many other aspects of our lives.  All of this relates to energy, of course.  If your city is fairly dense with mixed-use neighbourhoods that include shops, schools and parks in addition to homes, you have the potential for people to walk or cycle near home.  It's easier to build a good transit system in a city that doesn't have a lot of sprawl.

B.C. companies and organizations call for a plan to achieve climate target

The Energy Forum, of which BCSEA is proud to be a member, has released this letter to Premier Christy Clark, urging her to take the Climate Leadership Team's recommendations seriously, and bring BC back to its status as a climate leader.

Click here to view the press release with more information and download.

The Green Industrial Revolution

The new federal budget has increased funding for transitioning to a greener economy. But according to CBC Radio Host Bob McDonald, each Canadian will have to do their part to help the green industrial revolution by investing in it. In a recent article McDonald outlines “Why we need a green industrial revolution.

TRU's Solar Compass points students towards a brighter future

Imagine a world where the very roads you drive on power your home, where the sides of buildings produce clean, endless electricity. Better yet imagine a world where young adults, those bright minds faced with the great responsibility of shaping the future, are inspired to think of new ways to interweave renewable energy technology with everyday life. This is the vision of Dr. Michael Mehta, who leads Thompson Rivers University’s Solar Compass project.