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Climate Change

BCSEA Victoria Chapter Speakers Series

2014 - 2015

BCSEA Victoria Chapter will be hosting a series of six talks on key energy issues facing Canada, including an all-candidates meeting.

The Five Most Important Climate Solutions for City Councils in BC

1. Make a Sustainable Transportation Commitment

to aim for zero-carbon local transportation by creating ‘complete streets’ designed for all users, walkable neighbourhoods, and a world-class cycling environment; and by adopting world-class policies for transportation demand management, transit, ride-sharing, car-sharing, electric vehicles and freight.

There are great examples of pedestrian streets and centres in Europe. In Copenhagen, 36% of commute and school trips are made by bike; Bogota and Curitiba have shown the way for bus rapid transport; San Diego is showing the way for electric vehicles.

Pass the Baton: The Clean Energy Economy is Ready

Or as Upworthy would say:

“Look how rapidly the clean energy economy is growing.

You’ll be amazed.”

  

This article is available as a PDF - see very end for the file

Can we live without the tar sands, the oil and gas pipelines, the oil tankers, the fracking and the coal-fired power? Can we live without our gas-heated homes and factories, and our oil-powered planes, ships, trucks, trains and automobiles?

THE CARBON BUBBLE: Carbon Tracker’s Work in 2013

In 2013, the London-based organization Carbon Tracker, founded by Mark Campanale, continued to reveal the risks associated with fossil fuel assets and demonstrate the need for transparent indicators of climate risks.

In preparation for the BCSEA Webinar on Tuesday Feb 11th, here is an edited version of their 2013 report:

Grateful for a lot of help from our friends

Here at the Kamloops Chapter of the BCSEA, we have a lot to be grateful for. This fall, unexpected gifts remind us of how much support we're seeing for our message and our work.

Beyond Oil: Imagining the Future (Opinion Editorial)

Is it possible? We depend on oil for all our transport, much of our heating, and all our plastics. 

And yet like freezing cold water in the face, we know that if we are to keep global warming under control, we can burn no more than 20% of the world’s remaining oil. Any more, and we cross the critical global line past two degrees Celsius. 

We can prepare for a future without oil. 

Crossing 400: The Journey from Danger to Inspiration

I’ve worked on climate change for more twenty years. I’ve read all the scientist’s warnings, I’ve participated as the climate movement rose in hope and faltered in despair. I’ve shared frustration at the antics of the climate deniers and I’ve shared the determination of those who—with me—believe that with the right efforts and the right public buy-in, the world can prosper on 100% renewable energy, without any use of fossil fuels.

The Power of Partnerships in Community Engagement

As the lead organizer of The Solar Laundry Project (SLP) here in Kamloops, I’ve been on a steep learning curve. The SLP is an initiative of the Kamloops Chapter of the BC Sustainable Energy Association which encourages people to reduce their electrical consumption by hanging clothes to dry instead of using the dryer. For the past two years, we’ve organized an awareness campaign based on weekly draws for high-quality clotheslines during the summer months.

I’ve learned that a focus on fun goes a long way, great promotional photos are like gold, simple messaging is best, and good relationships with media are key to coverage. But perhaps the biggest single eye-opener has been the importance of partnerships.

Stories from the Showdown: BC Students Explore The Future They Want.

“That could have been really dangerous! The scientists could have made a mistake and sent you back to Jurassic times, and you could have been eaten by a dinosaur!” 

Climate Change Showdown Awards

The Kamloops Chapter of the BC Sustainable Energy Association (BCSEA) is delighted to announce this year’s winners in the Climate Change Showdown program, offered in partnership by the City of Kamloops and BCSEA. Top-scoring students will be honoured at the Kamloops City Council meeting Tuesday June 11, 2013 at 3:00 pm. The students learned about climate change in class and then worked on contest actions with their families over a four-week period. They reduced greenhouse gas emissions through eating local foods, turning down the thermostat, taking shorter showers and turning off the lights.