Loading page...

BC

The Power of Partnerships in Community Engagement

As the lead organizer of The Solar Laundry Project (SLP) here in Kamloops, I’ve been on a steep learning curve. The SLP is an initiative of the Kamloops Chapter of the BC Sustainable Energy Association which encourages people to reduce their electrical consumption by hanging clothes to dry instead of using the dryer. For the past two years, we’ve organized an awareness campaign based on weekly draws for high-quality clotheslines during the summer months.

I’ve learned that a focus on fun goes a long way, great promotional photos are like gold, simple messaging is best, and good relationships with media are key to coverage. But perhaps the biggest single eye-opener has been the importance of partnerships.

Keeping Cool with Shade

With the heat wave we just experienced, I’m sure all of us would have appreciated a big shade tree sheltering our homes from the blazing sun! The smart use of shade is one of those techniques and skills that made sense in earlier times and are coming back into use now. Many of us are trying to live more simply, avoiding waste and over-consumption of resources. Along with drying laundry on a clothesline, growing food in the garden, canning and preserving, we can keep our homes cool with shade and save on energy costs too.

Stories from the Showdown: BC Students Explore The Future They Want.

“That could have been really dangerous! The scientists could have made a mistake and sent you back to Jurassic times, and you could have been eaten by a dinosaur!” 

Climate Change Showdown Awards

The Kamloops Chapter of the BC Sustainable Energy Association (BCSEA) is delighted to announce this year’s winners in the Climate Change Showdown program, offered in partnership by the City of Kamloops and BCSEA. Top-scoring students will be honoured at the Kamloops City Council meeting Tuesday June 11, 2013 at 3:00 pm. The students learned about climate change in class and then worked on contest actions with their families over a four-week period. They reduced greenhouse gas emissions through eating local foods, turning down the thermostat, taking shorter showers and turning off the lights.

Keeping Cool with Windows

Here’s an example of how NOT to keep your home cool. A few years ago, my upstairs neighbour used to close the windows but leave blinds wide open on the hot summer days. The window air conditioner was going full blast all day while he was at work. Silly and wasteful, don’t you think? He moved out and I bought the place, moving upstairs in the same building. I had it fixed up with new paint and floors, and one of the best things I did was to put cellular blinds on the windows. We don’t use air conditioning. I can’t stand that noisy thing and I’m stubborn about not wasting electricity.

Ben Giudici presentation on Solar Photovoltaic

If you didn’t make it to our event last night, you missed a good one. About 50 people were fascinated by Ben Giudici’s presentation on solar photovoltaic systems, connecting solar systems to the grid, and the potential of solar energy In BC. Hands were popping up for questions long after Ben had expected to be finished.

The BCSEA's Chapters in Action

A quick snapshot from Vancouver, Victoria, Kamloops & Kelowna …

Catch an Incentive #3

The government has announced a new, ‘shrunk-but-still-there’ LiveSmart BC home energy efficiency incentives program, valid until March 31st 2014. 
 
If you’d like to save some energy and money and greenhouse gases, go immediately to the LiveSmart website, to see what’s available. 

Can Sudbury and Sea Urchins Save the Climate?

What? Sudbury? Sea Urchins? Hear me out.

1. Carbon dioxide is the largest contributor to global climate change.

2. Coal-fired power plants are the single largest source of CO2.

3. Nickel nanoparticles are a newly discovered ingredient that may … may … make it easy to capture carbon dioxide from a smokestack as a solid.

4. Sudbury produces lots of nickel.