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BCSEA Webinar: 100% Renewables - Roadmaps for powering states, countries, and the world with wind, water and sunlight

Webinar
Sep 17 2013 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm

Global warming, air pollution, and energy insecurity are three of the most significant problems facing the world today. Our guest Mark Jacobson from Stanford University will discuss these problems, and technical and economic plans to solve them by powering 100% of the world, individual countries, and states for all purposes, including electricity, transportation, industry, and heating/cooling, with wind, water, and sunlight together with efficiency measures, within 20-40 years. Specific plans for California and New York State will be discussed.

 

Relevant papers are at http://www.stanford.edu/group/efmh/jacobson/Articles/I/susenergy2030.html

 

Mark Z. Jacobson is Director of the Atmosphere/Energy Program and Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Stanford University. He is also a Senior Fellow of the Woods Institute for the Environment and Senior Fellow of the Precourt Institute for Energy.  He received a B.S. in Civil Engineering with distinction, an A.B.  in Economics with distinction, and an M.S. in Environmental Engineering from Stanford University, in 1988.  He received an M.S. in Atmospheric Sciences in 1991 and a PhD in Atmospheric Sciences in 1994 from UCLA. He has been on the faculty at Stanford since 1994. His work relates to the development and application of numerical models to understand better the effects of energy systems and vehicles on climate and air pollution and the analysis of renewable energy resources.

 

Mark has published two textbooks and over 130 peer-reviewed scientific journal articles. He received the 2005 American Meteorological Society Henry G. Houghton Award for "significant contributions to modeling aerosol chemistry and to understanding the role of soot and other carbon particles on climate" and the 2013 American Geophysical Union Ascent Award for "his dominating role in the development of models to identify the role of black carbon in climate change."

 

He co-authored a 2009 cover article in Scientific American with Dr. Mark DeLucchi of U.C. Davis on how to power the world with renewable energy, and has served on the Energy Efficiency and Renewables Advisory Committee to the U.S. Secretary of Energy.