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The BIG Questions: What Are Your Thoughts?

What are we thinking? When it comes to climate action and sustainable energy there are some tricky questions to which there are not yet any clear answers. So we thought we'd poll your thoughts to see how we are thinking collectively as a community. 

The questions are below: to answer them please go to the survey.

Next week, we will report back on your responses.

 

TRANSPORTATION

 

1.     What do you think will be the future renewable energy solution for long-distance trucking? Rank in order of likeliness:

(a)   Biofuel, with feedstock harvested in a certified sustainable manner

(b)  Hydrogen derived from renewable energy, not natural gas

(c)   Electric, assuming a major advance in electric batteries and battery range

(d)  Overland or underwater electromagnetic or Maglev tubes

(e)   None of the above. Far less trade, local manufacturing.

(f)   Other (please state)

 

2.     What do you think will be the future renewable energy solution for marine shipping?

Rank in order of likeliness:

(a)   Sustainably harvested biofuel

(b)  Hydrogen derived from renewable energy, not natural gas

(c)   Super-efficient ships powered by a mix of biofuel, hydrogen, wind and solar PV with super-batteries

(d)  None of the above. Far less trade, local manufacturing

(e)   Other (please state)

 

3.     What do you think will be the future renewable energy solution for aviation?

Rank in order of likeliness:

(a)   Sustainably harvested biofuel

(b)  Hydrogen derived from renewable energy, not natural gas

(c)   Super-efficient solar electric airplanes

(d)  None of the above. Far less flying.

(e)   Other (please state)

 

4.  How soon do you think we’ll see a choice of electric cars on the market in Canada with 300 km range that are comparable in price to conventional cars?

a)     2020

b)    2025

c)     2030

d)    2035

e)     2040

f)     Other (please state)

 

BUILDINGS

 

5.     What do you think most likely to persuade single-family homeowners to undertake an energy efficiency and renewable heat retrofit?

Rank in order of persuasiveness:

(a)   An increased carbon tax

(b)  The restoration of federal and provincial retrofit incentives

(c)   A 100% tax credit for all costs incurred

(d)  Pay-As-You-Save retrofit loan-repayments attached to utility bills

(e)   Persuasive neighbours who have done a retrofit showing you what they did, including cost and savings

(f)   A persuasive non-profit, providing personal support and one-stop access for all retrofit needs.

(g) Other (please state)

 

6. In a city such as Vancouver, where District Heat Systems is a central part of the city’s future plans, what do you think will be the main source of renewable heat? Rank in order of likeliness:

(a) Biomass

(b) Biogas

(c) Sewer heat

(d) Industrial waste heat

(e) Refrigeration heat recovery

(f) Ground-source heat

(g) Ocean-source heat

(h) Solar district heat gathered in summer from large solar thermal installations and stored underground for use in winter

(i) Other (please state)

 

ELECTRICITY

 

7. Which of these developments do you think will have the greatest impact on BC’s future electricity supply? Rank in order of importance:

 

(a) The falling price of solar power

(b) The falling price of wind power

(c) The falling price of electrical energy storage

(d) The disappearance of BC’s glaciers, and reduced snowpack

(e) A breakthrough in geothermal energy project financing methods

(f) Other (please state)

 

A PRICE ON CARBON

 

8.     What price on carbon do you think is needed to tackle the climate crisis?

(a)   $30 a tonne of CO2  (= 7 cents a litre of gasoline)

(b)  $50 (= 12 cents a litre)

(c)   $75 (= 17 cents a litre)

(d)  $100 (= 23 cents a litre)

(e)   $150 (= 35 cents a litre)

(f)   Other (please state)

 

9.     What price on carbon do you think is politically possible in BC to tackle the climate crisis?

(a)   $30 a tonne of CO2  (= 7 cents a litre of gasoline)

(b)  $50 (= 12 cents a litre)

(c)    $75 (= 17 cents a litre)

(d)    $100 (= 23 cents a litre)

(e)  $150 (= 35 cents a litre)

(f)    Other (please state)

 

10.     Which method of putting a price on carbon do you prefer?

Rank in order of preference:

(a)   A revenue-neutral carbon tax, like British Columbia’s, with a carbon tax rebate for low-income households.

(b)  A straight carbon tax, with the revenues being invested in climate solutions

(c)   A carbon fee and dividend, with every household receiving an annual cheque as the revenue is redistributed

(d)  Cap and trade, in which industrial GHG emissions are capped and a price on carbon emerges as businesses trade in emissions reductions to stay under the cap.

(e)    Other (please state)

 

HOW SOON?

 

11.     If there were supportive governments in Ottawa and in the Provinces, by when do you think Canada could realistically achieve a transition to 100% renewable energy?

(a)   2030

(b)  2040

(c)   2050

(d)  2060

(e)   Other (please state)

  

BARRIERS TO PROGRESS

 

12.  Why do you think we are not seeing faster progress towards meaningful climate action in Canada? Rank in order of preference:

(a)   The absence of a system of proportional voting that reflects the political preference of all Canadian voters, resulting in a federal government that is more conservative than most voters

(b)  A public perception that climate action threatens jobs and the economy

(c)   The impact of climate denial, generating confusion and uncertainty

(d)  Insufficient climate activism of all varieties

(e)   The absence of a positive attractive vision showing how Canada could flourish with a mostly 100% renewable energy economy

(g)   Other (please state)

 

THE FUTURE ECONOMY

 

13. Which of these possible future developments might make the greatest contribution to reducing our carbon footprint? Rank in order of contribution:

(a) The sharing economy (shared cars, bikes, tools, equipment)

(b) 3-D printing

(c) A global price on carbon that includes all exports

(d) Green business certification

(e) The rapid growth of socially responsible businesses and Benefit Corporations

(f) Required carbon reporting by banks and businesses

(g) Required carbon labelling on most products

(h) Clear evidence that an economy based on 100% renewable energy will support a flourishing economy with plenty of jobs.

(i) Other (please state)

 

THE END! Next week, we will report on your responses.